Fabric Storage Tubs DIY

fabric-storage-tubs-diy-1

If you hadn’t already guessed, I love buying fabric. I often find myself going into fabric shops ‘just to look’ and then buying something. I tend to purchase fat quarters, because they are an affordable way of getting that gorgeous fabric you fell in love with. But aside from a quilt, what do you actually use them for?

In this post, I’ll be showing you how to make some practical, yet pretty fabric storage pots using fabric I’ve been lucky enough to have supplied by The Fabric Fox. These pots are simple to make, and are an ideal way to experiment with new colours and fabrics. There are lots of tutorials available for fabric pots, using a variety of techniques. This method is simple, quick, and easy to achieve!

img_2413

You will need (for 1 pot):

  • Outer fabric (60cm x 25cm)
  • Lining fabric (60cm x 25cm)
  • Heavy weight interfacing (it doesn’t matter if it’s sew-in or iron-on, but it needs to be heavy enough to support the weight of the fabric)
  • Matching thread
  • Scissors
  • Pins
  • Ruler
  • Iron

Instructions:

  1. Cut two rectangles from your outer fabric, 30cm wide x 25cm tall. Repeat for your lining fabric and interfacing.
  2. If using iron-on interfacing, attach to the back of the outer fabric, if using sew-in interfacing, lay a piece on the wrong side of each rectangle. Place your outer fabric right sides together and pin.
  3. Using a straight stitch, sew along the two short sides and bottom of your outer fabric rectangle.
  4. Place your lining fabric right sides together, and also sew the sides and bottom.
  5. To make the pots stand on their own, we are going to add some corners. Pinch one of the bottom corners of your outer fabric so that it is a triangle (see picture) and press flat.
  6. Measure 4cm along the edge of the triangle and draw a straight line across. Repeat for the other 3 corners (outer and lining fabric).
  7. Using a straight stitch, sew along the line. Trim the excess fabric, approx. 1cm from your stitching.
  8. Turn the outer piece right side out. Insert your outer into your lining (see picture), and pin at the top. Align your side seams first and then pin all the way around. You’ll need to leave an opening of 10cm to allow you to turn the pot the right way out.
  9. Using a straight stitch, sew around the top, avoiding your 10cm opening. Finish your threads.
  10. Turn the whole pot right sides out through your opening.
  11. Tuck the lining back into the pot, ensuring you fold in the opening and pin so that it sits flush with the outer layer. Pin and then sew approximately 5mm from the edge, this will also close the 10cm opening you made earlier.
  12. Finish your threads, and turn over the top so that you can see the lining. Congratulations, you’ve made your own fabric storage pot!

Top tips:

  • Ensure your interfacing is heavy weight, so that it can support the weight of your fabric, this is essential if you are using a thin fabric such as cotton. The interfacing will also make your fabric crease quite easily (as you can see in my pictures!), so be sure to give your pot an iron at the end.
  • When making the corners of your pots, it’s important that the seams align, to give you a nice square corner. To help with this, insert a pin into the top line of stitching, push through, and line up with the bottom line of stitching. Pin and press with an iron. Repeat on the other corner and then for your lining fabric.
  • To help you remember your 10cm opening, try marking it out with pins, so that you know when to stop.
  • These pots are really versatile, you can easily change the size but using different sizes of fabric. The measurements I give above give you quite a long, narrow pot, but you can also make the pots more square, by increasing how far in you draw the line on step 6 (e.g. increase to 6cm).

The fabric used for my pots has kindly been given to me by The Fabric Fox from their new Cotton and Steel ranges. If you are heading to The Handmade Fair next week, do stop by their stall and say hello, and of course stock up on some of their gorgeous fabrics!

Disclosure: The Fabric Fox gave the fabric in this post to me free of charge. The fabric used was chosen by myself, and is representative of what I would usually use.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Fabric Storage Tubs DIY

  1. Hello. Will definitely be having a go at these. I have so many fat quarters! A tip with the interfacing creasing- if you iron it onto the lining it won’t matter so much if it isn’t smooth. I picked that tip up at a sewing course! X

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Great tip! I have to confess that I may have scrimped slightly on the interfacing, it took ages to adhere to the fabric, I wish I’d just waited and got the branded stuff. Let me know how you get on, would love to see what you make.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s