Exciting News!

 

sewcraftyHi everyone! It’s rare that I post on a weekday evening, but I’m finally able to share some exciting news with you.

Last year the lovely independent retailer Sew Crafty launched their design team, a bunch of bloggers and creatives who make lots of lovely things with the gorgeous products from the Sew Crafty website. Late last year, they put out a call for new members, and I instantly applied. I am so pleased to announce that I made the cut, and I’m now part of the Sew Crafty family.

There are many reasons why this is so exciting for me. First of all, I’m so happy to be working with another independent. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, the best fabric can be found in independent stores! Sew Crafty have been so supportive of my blog since the very early days, so it’s wonderful to work with them.

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Learning to Crochet: DIY Necklace Kit

img_3741I love all kinds of crafting, sewing, painting, papercrafts, I like a bit of variety. Crochet though? Not in my craft room. After attempting once, I gave up and never tried it again. Many of my crafty friends crochet lovely things, but I’ve never really caught the bug. When Liz of Fickle Craft Room approached me asking if I’d like to have a go at one of her new crochet kits, I knew it was time to finally have another go.

I already own one of the Fickle Craft Room necklaces, a lovely mustard yellow with dark grey beads, and I adore it. It’s one of those necklaces which always gets lovely comments, often followed by a ‘did you make it?’. Now, I’d be able to answer with a positive yes, instead of skirting around the subject!

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Christmas Crafting with Merrie and Bright

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December is here! It’s the most festive time of the year, and it’s time to start decorating the house for Christmas. The shops are full of wonderful decorations, but being creative, I do like to make something myself.

In previous years, I’ve made lots of bunting, but this year I fancied something a bit different. As soon as I saw the new range of wrapping paper from Merrie and Bright Calligraphy, I knew that I had to make something with it! In this post, I’ll be running through two simple makes using this wrapping paper that can easily be completed in front of a festive film!

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Fabric Storage Tubs DIY

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If you hadn’t already guessed, I love buying fabric. I often find myself going into fabric shops ‘just to look’ and then buying something. I tend to purchase fat quarters, because they are an affordable way of getting that gorgeous fabric you fell in love with. But aside from a quilt, what do you actually use them for?

In this post, I’ll be showing you how to make some practical, yet pretty fabric storage pots using fabric I’ve been lucky enough to have supplied by The Fabric Fox. These pots are simple to make, and are an ideal way to experiment with new colours and fabrics. There are lots of tutorials available for fabric pots, using a variety of techniques. This method is simple, quick, and easy to achieve!

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You will need (for 1 pot):

  • Outer fabric (60cm x 25cm)
  • Lining fabric (60cm x 25cm)
  • Heavy weight interfacing (it doesn’t matter if it’s sew-in or iron-on, but it needs to be heavy enough to support the weight of the fabric)
  • Matching thread
  • Scissors
  • Pins
  • Ruler
  • Iron

Instructions:

  1. Cut two rectangles from your outer fabric, 30cm wide x 25cm tall. Repeat for your lining fabric and interfacing.
  2. If using iron-on interfacing, attach to the back of the outer fabric, if using sew-in interfacing, lay a piece on the wrong side of each rectangle. Place your outer fabric right sides together and pin.
  3. Using a straight stitch, sew along the two short sides and bottom of your outer fabric rectangle.
  4. Place your lining fabric right sides together, and also sew the sides and bottom.
  5. To make the pots stand on their own, we are going to add some corners. Pinch one of the bottom corners of your outer fabric so that it is a triangle (see picture) and press flat.
  6. Measure 4cm along the edge of the triangle and draw a straight line across. Repeat for the other 3 corners (outer and lining fabric).
  7. Using a straight stitch, sew along the line. Trim the excess fabric, approx. 1cm from your stitching.
  8. Turn the outer piece right side out. Insert your outer into your lining (see picture), and pin at the top. Align your side seams first and then pin all the way around. You’ll need to leave an opening of 10cm to allow you to turn the pot the right way out.
  9. Using a straight stitch, sew around the top, avoiding your 10cm opening. Finish your threads.
  10. Turn the whole pot right sides out through your opening.
  11. Tuck the lining back into the pot, ensuring you fold in the opening and pin so that it sits flush with the outer layer. Pin and then sew approximately 5mm from the edge, this will also close the 10cm opening you made earlier.
  12. Finish your threads, and turn over the top so that you can see the lining. Congratulations, you’ve made your own fabric storage pot!

Top tips:

  • Ensure your interfacing is heavy weight, so that it can support the weight of your fabric, this is essential if you are using a thin fabric such as cotton. The interfacing will also make your fabric crease quite easily (as you can see in my pictures!), so be sure to give your pot an iron at the end.
  • When making the corners of your pots, it’s important that the seams align, to give you a nice square corner. To help with this, insert a pin into the top line of stitching, push through, and line up with the bottom line of stitching. Pin and press with an iron. Repeat on the other corner and then for your lining fabric.
  • To help you remember your 10cm opening, try marking it out with pins, so that you know when to stop.
  • These pots are really versatile, you can easily change the size but using different sizes of fabric. The measurements I give above give you quite a long, narrow pot, but you can also make the pots more square, by increasing how far in you draw the line on step 6 (e.g. increase to 6cm).

The fabric used for my pots has kindly been given to me by The Fabric Fox from their new Cotton and Steel ranges. If you are heading to The Handmade Fair next week, do stop by their stall and say hello, and of course stock up on some of their gorgeous fabrics!

Disclosure: The Fabric Fox gave the fabric in this post to me free of charge. The fabric used was chosen by myself, and is representative of what I would usually use.